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Naresh Jain's Random Thoughts on Software Development and Adventure Sports
     
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Who is a Developer?

A lot of people think, if they can write some code, they qualify as a software developer.

IMHO don’t call yourself a developer if you don’t take ownership and responsibility for solving the overall, real business/user problem.

A good developer

  • understands the overall problem and its context.
  • has good problem solving skills (we are in the business of creative problem solving)
  • has empathy for the users and is a user and business advocate.
  • takes ownership by being a part-of the team and having a sense of belonging.
  • makes investment into continuous learning & improvement

[Agile and Software Craftsmanship movements has made great strives in this direction. However some Agile folks don't get it. We can't draw a line and say this side is business and that side is development. Its ONE team working towards a common goal. Unfortunately, I've seen a lot of teams who end up creating artificial boundaries between people wanting the software and people building it.]

Anyway, having the ability to just writing some code does not qualify you to be a developer.

Almost a year ago, I wrote something more insightful: Programming in the 21st Century

  • http://www.gettingagile.com/ Chris Sterling

    Good day Naresh,

    I agree about being a developer. When working with teams for the first time I find it has helped for the entire cross-functional team to recognize themselves as “developers”, not just the coders. As the team goes a few iterations and we continue to use this language it seems to help bind them towards working on the business need rather than just their task at hand. The focus is how we can develop the best product given the context we are in. Thanks.

  • Rajadurai

    I agree with you. A developer is not just responsible for writing code. He is the one who responsible for getting effective solution for the problem. His thinking shoudl be more creative and innovative.

  • http://mgfa.biz/ Mervin Faulkner

    I agree with the comments so far with one refinement to Chris.
    With over 40 years experience in the software industry, from self-taught programmer (coder) to owner of a software firm, I have learned that there are developers and there are coders. It would be nice to get coders to think like developers but they cannot. It is the responsibility of the team to utilize each members strengths to the overall good of the project.
    As Rajadurai said, a developer is more of a problem solver than a coder is.
    Luckily there are more coders then there are developers because a team made up of only developers would be very inefficient, too many leaders and not enough followers.

  • http://twitter.com/DavidJCMorris David J C Morris

    This goes to the heart of the difference between a programmer/coder and a developer — in the (ahem) olden days we used to be called analyst/programmers, but developers says it much more succinctly.

  • http://twitter.com/DavidJCMorris David J C Morris

    This goes to the heart of the difference between a programmer/coder and a developer — in the (ahem) olden days we used to be called analyst/programmers, but developers says it much more succinctly.


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