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Naresh Jain's Random Thoughts on Software Development and Adventure Sports
     
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Where is the real innovation happening?

It appears to me that the Agile Community is falling behind the innovation curve. At conferences, user groups, mailing list, etc, we see the same old same old stuff (may be I’m missing something). So where is the real innovation happening? What space should I be watching?

These were the questions I posed to the group @ the SDTConf 2009. Later, during our discussion at the conference we tried answering them. After a wonderful discussion we come up with some suggestions:

  • Web 2.0
  • Alternative Language (non-mainstream languages) space. Lot of interesting experiments going on in
    • Dynamic language space
    • Functional language space
    • Hybrid language space
  • Domain Specific Language space
  • Could Computing, Parallel Computing (Grid Computing), Virtualization space
  • Code Harvesting Space – Check out Test Driven Code Search and Code Genie as a starting point
  • Complex Adaptive Systems and its implication on our social interactions space. Dave Snowden’s work is a good starting point
  • eLearning and visual assessments (feedback) of a programming session. Check out Visualizing Proficiency
  • Polyglot Programming space
  • With Google Apps, people are able to build 100s of Apps each month and get instant feedback on their ideas
  • Social Networking and Second Life space
  • Conference: Lot of interesting experiments are been conducted in the conference space. Conferences have evolved to something very different from before.
  • Distributed Development and Remote Pairing space

If you would like to contribute to this list, please add your point on the SDTConf Wiki.

  • http://blog.adsdevshop.com Robert Dempsey

    Hi Naresh,

    It seems to me that Agile is still in the selling phase. More companies are talking about their applications of agile and the benefits gained, and more companies are coming online. The same thing happened in the Ruby on Rails world. At first it was tons of marketing, and now, a number of years later, Rails is a known commodity and the community is doing truly innovative work.

    I was reading a post the other day about a guy who was packaging up a “standard” agile implementation for companies to adopt. While we know that a hybrid approach (scrum + xp + whatever) is a typical result once business environment and culture are taken into account, the point was that businesses need a starting point, and it's easier to sell a package rather than an amorphous service.

    I do believe that there is innovation occuring in the Agile community, we just don't really hear about it as much. Here's why.

    When I was at the Agile Development Practices Conference in 2008 here in Orlando I heard speakers deriding audience members for not doing “pure Agile.” What a load of crap I thought. The same thing happened in the Rails world where people would deride newbies for not knowing everything already. We got told by Chad Fowler to stop being a bunch of assholes, and we did. Adoption of Rails has since increased greatly and the community is fantastic.

    I think the same thing needs to happen in Agile. People need to stop taking a purist approach and show everyone how hybrid approaches can work extremely well. Then we'll see how far the innovation has come.
    Thanks for having a great blog. I've been following for quite some time, and am now happy to join in .

  • gustin

    > People need to stop taking a purist approach and show everyone how hybrid approaches can work extremely well.

    Great Point.

    How is an Agilist a “Purist” anyway?

    By definition agile should change, bend and morph to adapt to any enterprise or environment.

    As long as the core principles and values are adhered to, an agile process will need to change to some degree for the specific environment, organization and scenario.

    A tough thing with Agile is that is requires such personal responsibility to be successful, it doesn't work as well in the command and control environment of most corporations/enterprises.

    As far as innovation, it is happening mostly in startups that are in the trenches living it.

    ~)o
    gustin

  • http://blog.adsdevshop.com/ Robert Dempsey

    Hi Naresh,

    It seems to me that Agile is still in the selling phase. More companies are talking about their applications of agile and the benefits gained, and more companies are coming online. The same thing happened in the Ruby on Rails world. At first it was tons of marketing, and now, a number of years later, Rails is a known commodity and the community is doing truly innovative work.

    I was reading a post the other day about a guy who was packaging up a “standard” agile implementation for companies to adopt. While we know that a hybrid approach (scrum + xp + whatever) is a typical result once business environment and culture are taken into account, the point was that businesses need a starting point, and it's easier to sell a package rather than an amorphous service.

    I do believe that there is innovation occuring in the Agile community, we just don't really hear about it as much. Here's why.

    When I was at the Agile Development Practices Conference in 2008 here in Orlando I heard speakers deriding audience members for not doing “pure Agile.” What a load of crap I thought. The same thing happened in the Rails world where people would deride newbies for not knowing everything already. We got told by Chad Fowler to stop being a bunch of assholes, and we did. Adoption of Rails has since increased greatly and the community is fantastic.

    I think the same thing needs to happen in Agile. People need to stop taking a purist approach and show everyone how hybrid approaches can work extremely well. Then we'll see how far the innovation has come.
    Thanks for having a great blog. I've been following for quite some time, and am now happy to join in .

  • gustin

    > People need to stop taking a purist approach and show everyone how hybrid approaches can work extremely well.

    Great Point.

    How is an Agilist a “Purist” anyway?

    By definition agile should change, bend and morph to adapt to any enterprise or environment.

    As long as the core principles and values are adhered to, an agile process will need to change to some degree for the specific environment, organization and scenario.

    A tough thing with Agile is that is requires such personal responsibility to be successful, it doesn't work as well in the command and control environment of most corporations/enterprises.

    As far as innovation, it is happening mostly in startups that are in the trenches living it.

    ~)o
    gustin


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