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Agile India 2017: Meet our Keynote Speakers | Pre/Post Conference Workshops Announced

January 11th, 2017

Agile India 2017 is Asia’s Largest and Premier Conference on Agile, Lean, Scrum, eXtreme Programming, Lean-Startup, Kanban, Continuous Delivery, Lean UX, Product Discovery, DevOps, Enterprise Agile, Patterns and more…

Smart Pricing is still available as of 11 January. REGISTER TODAY before prices increase! Also check out the Conference Program

Interesting in supporting this conference, checkout our sponsorship guide.

OUR KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Joshua Kerievsky – CEO @ Industrial Logic Inc.

Joshua is a globally recognized thought leader in Agile and Lean software development. He is an entrepreneur, author and programmer passionate about excellent software and discovering better, faster and safer ways to produce it. As the founder and visionary leader of Industrial Logic, Joshua is currently defining what it means to practice modern agility. Modern agile practitioners work to Make People Awesome, Make Safety A Prerequisite, Experiment & Learn Rapidly and Deliver Value Continuously. Joshua is a sought-after international speaker, author of the best-selling, Jolt Cola-award winning book, Refactoring to Patterns, and a guru-level practitioner of Lean/Agile methods. His pioneering work in Agile processes has helped popularize Agile Readiness Assessments, Chartering, Storytest-Driven Development and Iterative Usability, many of which are now standard in Agile/Lean processes. He is an active blogger on forward-thinking, modern software topics with an edge.

Dave Thomas – Founding Director of Agile Alliance, Founder of YOW! Conferences @ Kx Systems

Dave Thomas, Chief Scientist/CSO, Kx Systems, Co-Founder and past Chairman of Bedarra Research Labs (BRL), creators of the Ivy visual analytics workbench and ACM Distinguished Engineer. Founder and past CEO of Object Technology International (OTI), becoming CEO of IBM OTI Labs after its sale to IBM. With a unique ability to see the future and translate research into competitive products, he is known for his contributions to Object Technology including IBM VisualAge and Eclipse IDEs, Smalltalk and Java virtual machines. Dave is a popular, humorous, albeit opinionated keynote speaker with an impressive breadth of business experience and technical depth. He is a thought leader in large-scale software engineering and a founding director of the Agile Alliance. With close links the R&D community Dave is an adjunct research professor at Carleton University in Canada and held past positions at UQ and QUT in Australia. He has been a business and technical advisor to many technology

companies including Kx Systems. Dave is founder and chairman of the YOW! Australia and Lambda Jam conferences, and is a GOTO Conference Fellow.

Rajesh Rudraradhya – Vice President and Head of Engineering @ Hike Messenger

Rajesh spent more than 15 years in the Silicon Valley, working for companies like Digital Equipment Corporation, HP, Google and Motorola. He joins Hike from Motorola where he was most recently the Director and Head of Wearables and Internet-of-Things software. Rajesh’s expertise lies in creating scalable, consumer-facing software products in the mobile space, overseeing end-to-end engineering & product development life cycle, and building cross-functional teams. Offering in-depth business and technical acumen, complemented by strong expertise in shaping product strategies into tangible products, strengthening stakeholder alliances, integrating Agile best practices, and streamlining processes that increase revenue, lower costs, and create business value.

Nate Clinton – Managing Director @ Cooper

Nate is the Managing Director at the San Francisco office. In his role, he blends the decisiveness and collaborative skills of a product manager with the acumen of an economist to build bridges with people and organizations. Equal parts teacher and student, Nate leads initiatives in content creation, business development, and creative leadership.

At Cooper, he helped United Airlines find new ways to reward loyal customers, led an effort at GE Healthcare to create a strategy for the international expansion of a key product line, and designed solutions for workplace collaboration, delivering technology to schools, and the future of the connected kitchen. Before Cooper, Nate led design and product management at BuildZoom, and was a Director of Product Management at Thomson Reuters.

Mitchell Hashimoto – Founder and CTO @ HashiCorp

Mitchell Hashimoto is best known as the creator of Vagrant, Packer, Terraform and Consul. Mitchell is the founder of HashiCorp, a company that builds powerful and elegant DevOps tools. He is also an O’Reilly author. He is one of the top GitHub users by followers, activity, and contributions. “Automation obsessed,” Mitchell solves problems with as much computer automation as possible.

Jez Humble – Owner @ Jez Humble & Associates LLC

Jez Humble is co-author of the Jolt Award winning Continuous Delivery, published in Martin Fowler’s Signature Series (Addison Wesley, 2010), and Lean Enterprise, in Eric Ries’ Lean series (O’Reilly, 2015). He has consulted for many Global 500 companies to help them achieve technical excellence and deploy a culture of experimentation and learning. His focus is on helping organizations discover and deliver valuable, high-quality products. He is co-founder of consulting company Humble, O’Reilly & Associates, and teaches at UC Berkeley.

PRE/POST CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

Workshops have very limited seats. BOOK EARLY to ensure you don’t miss these great opportunities!

Modern Agile Workshop: Joshua Kerievsky

Much has changed since the publishing of the Agile Manifesto in 2001. Pioneers and practitioners of lean and agile methods have examined weaknesses and friction points, experimented with simpler approaches, and produced agile processes that are safer, simpler and far more capital efficient. The result is modern agile. It’s values-driven, non-prescriptive and an easier starting point than antiquated agile processes. Modern agile amplifies the values and practices of organizations that have discovered better ways to get awesome results. Are you still cramming low-quality work in the end of each sprint, struggling with growing technical debt, arguing about “definition of done” or frustrated that “management/product never gives us time to do it right?”

Agile Leadership: Accelerating Business Agility by Todd Little, Kent McDonald, Niel Nickolaisen

Leaders today face constant, accelerating change driven by technology and incredibly high expectations from both internal and external. As IT leaders, we need to transform our roles and our departments. In this workshop, we focus on, teach and practice the tools of transformational leadership. After each part of the training, participants are ready to use the tools to re-define their roles and deliver what their organizations need – brilliant leadership.

Disciplined Agile in a Nutshell by Scott Ambler

Disciplined Agile (DA) is an IT process decision framework for delivering sophisticated agile solutions in the enterprise. It builds on the existing proven practices from agile methods such as Scrum, Extreme Programming (XP), Lean software development, Unified Process, and Agile Modeling to include other aspects necessary for success in the enterprise. The one-day workshop is not technical and is suitable for all team members. The workshop is also valuable for management tasked with moving from traditional approaches to agile.

Leading Creative Ideation by Andrew Kaufteil, Nate Clinton

Crack your head open and release a surge of creative ideas with engaging activities that promote clarity, inspiration, and buzz within your organization. We’ll cover methods and facilitation tools to ensure you run fruitful brainstorming sessions, leading your team to more and better ideas. You’ll learn to frame the problem you’re solving, come up with an exploration strategy, and facilitate the session, giving you and your team new ways to get inspired and energized when looking for solutions.

Analytics Driven Testing for Mobile Apps by Julian Harty

Testing of mobile apps is easy to do poorly, however, we don’t need to be constrained by mediocrity. Instead let’s learn about the foundations of how mobile platforms and development technologies are used to create apps and how these are then interpreted by the devices the apps are installed on so that we know the sorts of bugs and problems that affect many mobile apps i.e. testing techniques that may be generally applicable to most apps.

The Art of Refactoring by Joshua Kerievsky

Code that is difficult to understand, hard to modify and challenging to extend is hazardous to developers, users and organizations. Refactoring, or improving the design of existing code, is one of our greatest defenses against such code. Yet many programmers lack formal training in refactoring. Furthermore, management tends to lack knowledge about the value of refactoring. This one-day workshop is designed to address these needs.

NoEstimates? by Woody Zuill, Todd Little

Let’s explore the purpose and use of estimates in the management of software development efforts, and consider possible alternatives. Why do we estimate and are we making estimates that are actually useful? In this session we’ll participate in some interactive information gathering exercises to see if we can gain a shared idea of our current understanding of the purpose and use of estimates. We will examine the nature of software development projects and explore some real data to shed light on the art and science of software estimation. Our exploration goal is to see if we can work together to come up with some ideas about improving on the traditional approaches to using estimates.

Continuous Delivery by Jez Humble

Getting software released to users is often a painful, risky, and time-consuming process. The practice of continuous delivery sets out the principles and technical practices that enable rapid, low-risk delivery of high quality, valuable new functionality to users. In this workshop, Jez Humble presents an in-depth guide to the principles and practices behind continuous delivery and the DevOps movement, along with case studies from real companies and ideas to help you adopt continuous delivery and DevOps within your organization.

The Fast Foundation Workshop by Jeremy Kriegl

Once upon a time, we had ‘Discovery’, ‘Define’, and ‘Design’. These phases let us explore the problem and the audience, while conceiving a holistic solution. Now we have sprints, complete with a backlog that seems like it appears overnight and a development team that is going to build with or without design to guide it. How do we continue to create great products? This 1-day workshop enables you to engage your clients and stakeholders to quickly define the key elements of your product or project, aligns the team, and identifies critical risks. When it is complete, everyone has a good idea of what is going to be built as well as what it will take to get there.

Enabling Company-wide Agility in a Dynamic World by Jutta Eckstein, John Buck

Today companies are expected to be flexible and both rapidly responsive and resilient to change, which basically asks them to be Agile. Yet, doing Agile (the mechanics) is different from being Agile (the mindset). The mindset lets you apply flexible Agile patterns not only for software development teams but for whole company. In this workshop, we will examine what being Agile really means and how it can be implemented by combining principles from the Agile Manifesto, Sociocracy, Beyond Budgeting, and Open Space. We’ll draw on everyone’s experiences to show the path to transforming our companies into agile enterprises – from Board to janitor, offering concrete tools and methods that participants can apply right away.

Container-driven Continuous Deployment with Docker, Git, and Jenkins by David Laribee

In the early 2000s, eXtreme Programming (XP) introduced agility to software engineers. Contemporary cultural and technical innovations – container technology, distributed version control systems, the proliferation of free and open source software, and the DevOps movement – have significantly expanded our possibilities.

In this one day, hands-on workshop, we’ll build a modern continuous deployment pipeline based on Git, Jenkins, and Docker.

Spread the Word

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Eclipse Summit India 2016 – by the community for the community!

August 5th, 2016

Year 2016 is special for Eclipse users and community in India – we have the first ever conference focused on Eclipse Technologies, Eclipse Summit India, scheduled for Aug 25th to 27th in Bangalore at the Hotel Chancery Pavilion. Eclipse Summit India is being organized in collaboration with the Eclipse Foundation and will feature some of the best speakers from the past EclipseCon conferences around the world.

In 2010, we organized the first “Eclipse Day” – a day for the Eclipse community in Bangalore to get together and share expertise. We still remember that day at a small but cozy hotel on Infantry Road in Bangalore, when we kicked off the very first “Eclipse Day” in India. We followed the tradition in 2011, when SAP came forward to organize it in their campus. There were two more Eclipse Day editions in Bangalore in subsequent years – one organized at IBM and the other one at BOSCH. Each year we raised the bar in terms of content as well as participation. Thus the idea of Eclipse Summit was born!

Eclipse Summit India 2016

The conference is spread across 3 days – Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Day-1, Thursday, is dedicated for pre-conference paid workshops. We have lined up 4 workshops by technical leaders in Eclipse space in some of the key Eclipse technologies – Eclipse IoT, Eclipse e4 Platform, Eclipse JDT and Eclipse Modeling Framework. The next two days are dedicated for conference tracks – we have two tracks each on Friday and Saturday. On each of the days, we kick off the proceedings with keynotes by thought leaders in the Industry.

On Friday, we are privileged to have Mike Milinkovich, Executive Director of Eclipse Foundation deliver the Keynote. On Saturday, we have two keynotes – Sumit Rao, VP of Engineering at Cerner Corporation, as the first keynote speaker and Viral Shah, co-creator of the Julia Language as the second keynote speaker. You can find the complete program here: https://confengine.com/eclipse-summit-2016/schedule/rich

Friday Aug 26th, we have two tracks – one focusing on Language Runtime (Java, Node.js, Mobile) and the other on Eclipse IoT Technology. We are fortunate to have leaders from each of these areas – Srikanth Sankaran, whose talks at past EclipseCon were rated amongst the best, will take us through the evolution of Java beyond Java-9, while Benjamin Cabé, Eclipse IoT expert at Eclipse Foundation will unveil the power of Eclipse IoT technologies. These talks are followed by a variety of talks and demonstrations that will expose you to the latest developments and trends in these areas.

On Saturday, the event continues with the focus on language technologies in one of the tracks, while Eclipse Platform focus on the other track. In the language track, Stephan Hermann, Java language guru, will take you through the dynamism in Java language while in the platform track, we have Prouvost, an expert on Eclipse e4 Platform unraveling the mystery of e4. Don’t know what e4 is? Well, now you have a reason to not miss this!

Eclipse Summit India is a conference organized by the Eclipse community for the community. Organizers have done their bit in lining up some of the eminent speakers, who are experts in their own domains. Now it is your, Eclipse community’s – turn, to contribute to it by actively participating to make it a success. Eagerly looking forward to meet you all at the conference!

We’ve last few seats left, register here: https://confengine.com/eclipse-summit-2016/register

Agile India 2016 – 5 Conferences + 16 Pre/Post Conf Workshops (March, Bangalore)

January 28th, 2016

Agile India 2016 Conference

Over the last 9 months, our program team of 26 volunteers from 8 different countries have worked together to put together a fantastic program for you.

We got a total of 333 proposals and have selected 108 proposals spread over 10 days.

Proposed vs. Accepted Proposals for Agile India 2016 Conference

Conference Speakers

We are happy to confirm that we’ve 86 Speakers from 18 countries presenting at this very conference.

Agile India 2016 Speakers

Conference Program

The team has worked very hard to make sure we’ve a nice balance of topics selected for you at the conference.

Agile India 2016 Proposal Type

Online Registration

Choose from 5 Conferences:

And 16 Pre/Post Conference Workshops:

Register here: https://confengine.com/agile-india-2016/register

Agile India 2016 Sponsors

Big thanks to our sponsors for supporting the conference.

We’ve a couple of more sponsorship opportunities available.

Check: http://2016.agileindia.org/#sponsor/become-sponsor

Social Links:

Why did the Stats dip in Agile India 2015 Conference?

August 8th, 2015

Agile India 2014 Conference was happy to host 1236 Attendees from 28 different countries. The attendees belong to 226 different companies and play 342 different rolesMore details

However in Agile India 2015 Conference we hosted 817 Attendees from 26 different countries. The attendees belong to 165 different companies and play 270 different rolesMore details

Also there was a proportionate drop in the number of sponsors. 14 sponsors in 2014 as opposed to 11 in 2015. So many people ask us why the numbers dipped? That’s a fair question. Following are the reasons why we think the numbers dipped:

  1. We moved from Four 1-day mini-conferences to Two 2-day mini-conferences. (So naturally the count will dip. In 2016, we are back to Five 1-day mini-conferences.)
  2. In 2015, we shrunk the program team size to 9 members from 29 members in 2014. Reason: we wanted to experiment and see what happens if we don’t decide the team upfront, but add members to the team only based on their contributions (esp. via the Submission System.) I guess that did not work out all that well. In 2016, we are back to a 26 member team that is decided upfront.
  3. Overall the planning for the 2015 conference was delayed. Only in Sep 2014 we started actively working on the conference. As opposed to starting in July 2013 for the 2014 conference. (For 2016, we started work in June 2015 itself.)
  4. Part of the reason for the delay was because, we were busy planning the Agile Pune 2014 Conference. Now planning 2 fairly large, international conferences on the same topic, 4 months apart, can lead to them competing with each other. Each year we do organise a bunch of smaller, regional conferences. However with the Pune conference we got bit ambitious. A good lesson learned.
  5. The themes selected for the 2015 conference was a repeat from the most popular themes from 2014 conference. In hindsight, that was a bad idea. Participants and Companies want something new every year. (For 2016, we have 5 brand new, relevant and trendy themes: Research Camp, Lean Startup, Enterprise Agile, Continuous Delivery & DevOps and Agile in the Trenches.)

I can go on…but you get the idea.

This does not mean we will stop experimenting. We’ve been successfully running this conference for 11 years and every year we try something new, something different. That’s what keeps the excitement & enthusiasm for us (a group of volunteers, with regular day-time jobs.)

A Bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the Bush

August 1st, 2015

In software world we call this speculative generality or YAGNI or over engineering.

IMHO we should not be afraid to throw parts of your system out every 6-8 months and rebuild it. Speed and Simplicity trumps everything! Also in 6-8 months, new technology, your improved experience, better clarity, etc. will help you design a better solution than what you can design today.

Just to be clear, I’m not suggesting that we do a sloppy job and rewrite the system because of sloppiness. I’m recommending, let’s solve today’s problem in the simplest, cleanest and most effective/efficient way. Let’s not pretend to know the future and build things based on that, because none of us know what the future looks like. Best we can do is guess the future, and we humans are not very good at it.

Agile India 2016 – Call for Proposals

July 29th, 2015

Agile India volunteers have started working on Agile India 2016 Conference. We are planning to host the conference at the same venue (Hotel Chancery Pavilion) in Bangalore from 14th – 21st Mar 2016 (8 Days.)

We are now open for proposals to following conference themes (and here are their theme chairs):

  • Research Camp (March 15th) – Jyothi Rangaiah and Ashay Saxena
  • Lean Startup (March 16th) – Nitin and Tathagat (ad interim)
  • Enterprise Agile (March 17th) – Evan Leybourn and Ravi Kumar
  • DevOps and Continuous Delivery (March 18th) – Joel Tosi and S Sivaguru
  • Agile in the Trenches (March 19th) – Ellen Grove and Leena S N

More details: http://2016.agileindia.org/#program/theme

The conference will host 3 parallel tracks. The CFP Early Bird Submissions will close on Sep 10th.

Please submit your proposals at http://confengine.com/agile-india-2016/proposals

Speaker Compensation: http://2016.agileindia.org/#speaker/compensation

Please speard the word:
Twitter: #AgileIndia2016 or @agileindia
Website: http://2016.agileindia.org

Discount Code: Open Web & jQuery Conference – 22-25th July Bangalore

July 6th, 2015

Open Web and jQuery Conference

The jQuery foundation is making their first trip to Bangalore to bring together experts from across the field of front-end development to bring you up-to speed on the latest open web technologies. Get the inside scoop on front-end development, code architecture and organization, design and implementation practices, tooling and workflow improvements, and emerging browser technologies.

We hope that you can use this opportunity to share ideas, socialize, and work together on advancing the present and future success of the front-end eco-system.

More details: http://jqueryconf.in

Online Registrations

First 25 people to register at http://booking.agilefaqs.com/jquery-conf-2015 can avail a special 15% discount. Use discount code – Managed@Chao$

Meet

jQuery Speakers

  • Dave Methvin – jQuery Core Lead | President of jQuery Board
  • Kris Borchers – Executive Director of jQuery Board
  • Scott González – jQuery UI Lead
  • Bodil Stokke – Functional Programming Hipster
  • Darcy Clarke – Co-Founder, Themify
  • Eric Schoffstall – Creator, Gulp
  • John K Paul – Organizer, NYC HTML5
  • Alexis Abril – Committer, CanJS
  • and 21 more speakers

Program

1. Pre-Conference Workshops – Wednesday, July 22

  • Optimizing and Debugging Web Sites by Dave Methvin
  • Revolutionizing your CSS! by Darcy Clarke
  • Contributing to the jQuery Foundation by Kris Borchers
  • JavaScript: The Misunderstood Parts by Alexis Abril

2. Open Web Conf – Thursday, July 23
Talks on Functional Reactive Programming, ES6, Escher.jl, Famo.us, CanJS, Ionic Framework, Kendo UI, Arduino, WebRTC and The Future of Video.

3. jQuery Conf– Fri, 24th & Sat, 25th July
Talks on The jQuery Foundation, Grunt, AngularJS, TDD in JS, Securing jQuery Code, Performance beyond Page Load, Responsive Web, jQuery Gotchas, Functional Reactive Programming, RxJS, ReactJS, Om, Memory Leaks, D3 and WebRTC.

4. Hackathon hosted by Joomla project – Friday 24th 2:00 PM – Sat 25th 2:00 PM
Details will be published shortly…

Sponsors

Big thanks to Freshdesk for supporting this conference as a Diamond Sponsor.

Venue

Hotel Chancery Pavilion, Residency Road, Bangalore

Social

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/jqueryconf
Twitter – https://twitter.com/jqueryconf
LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/grp/home?gid=8301395
Website – http://jqueryconf.in

OS X Yosemite 10.10 + cURL 7.37.1 – CA Certificate Issue & curl_ssl_verifypeer Flag

June 28th, 2015

If you are using Opauth-Twitter and suddenly you find that the Twitter OAuth is failing on OS X Yosemite, then it could be because  of the CA certificate issue.

In OS X Yosemite 10.10, they switched cURL’s version from 7.30.0 to 7.37.1 [curl 7.37.1 (x86_64-apple-darwin14.0) libcurl/7.37.1 SecureTransport zlib/1.2.5] and since then cURL always tries to verify the SSL certificate of the remote server.

In the previous versions, you could set curl_ssl_verifypeer to false and it would skip the verification. However from 7.37, if you set curl_ssl_verifypeer to false, it complains “SSL: CA certificate set, but certificate verification is disabled”.

Prior to version 0.60, tmhOAuth did not come bundled with the CA certificate and we used to get the following error:

SSL: can’t load CA certificate file <path>/vendor/opauth/Twitter/Vendor/tmhOAuth/cacert.pem

You can get the latest cacert.pem from here http://curl.haxx.se/ca/cacert.pem and saving it under /Vendor/tmhOAuth/cacert.pem (Latest version of tmbOAuth already has this in their repo.)

And then we need to set the $defaults (Optional parameters) curl_ssl_verifypeer to true in TwitterStrategy.php on line 48.

P.S: Turning off curl_ssl_verifypeer is actually a bad security move. It can make your server vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attack.

Agile India 2016 – Call for Program Committee

May 1st, 2015

Agile India 2016 Conf is Asia’s Largest & Premier Conference on Agile, Lean, Scrum, eXtreme Programming, Lean-Startup, Kanban, Continuous Delivery, DevOps, Patterns and more…

This time we are hosting a mega eight-day conference, starting on March 14th (Monday), where experts and practitioners from around the world will share their experience. The number of parallel tracks will be decided based on the quality of proposals we get. We are hoping that conference will host at least 3 parallel tracks.

Overall Agenda (tentative):

  • Pre-Conference Workshop – 14th and 15th March (10:00 AM – 6:00 PM)
  • Research Camp – 15th March (10:00 AM – 5:00 PM)
    ** Research Paper Presentation
    ** Open Space
    ** Brainstorming on improving Industry-Academia Collaboration
  • Executive Leadership Conclave – 15th March (5:00 PM – 10:00 PM)
    ** Break-up
    *** Keynote – 60 mins
    *** Fishbowl – 90 mins
    *** Group Activity on Future Direction – 90 mins
    *** Cocktail Dinner Party
  • Lean Startup – 16th March (9:00 AM – 6:30 PM)
    ** Topics
    *** Customer Development (Product Discovery)
    *** Crafting MVPs & Safe-Fail Experimentation
    *** Design Thinking
    *** Lean UX
    *** Lean Delivery
    *** Actionable Metrics
    *** 90 mins Hands-On Workshops
  • Enterprise Agile – 17th March (9:00 AM – 6:30 PM)
    ** Topics
    *** Scaling Agile – Frameworks
    *** People (career) & Performance Appraisals
    *** Tools – Portfolio Management, Distributed Teams
    *** 90 mins Hands-On Workshops
  • Continuous Delivery & DevOps – 18th March (9:00 AM – 6:30 PM)
    ** Topics
    ** Culture Transformation
    ** Software Craftsmanship
    *** TDD/BDD, CI, Refactoring
    *** Evolutionary Design
    *** Test Pyramid
    *** Legacy Code
    ** Cross-functional Team Collaboration
    ** DevOps Tools – Build, Deployment, Monitoring
    ** 90 mins Hands-On Workshops
  • Agile in the Trenches – 19th March (9:00 AM – 6:30 PM)
    ** Topics
    *** Agile Challenges (20 mins experience reports only)
    *** Abuse of Agile (20 mins experience reports only)
    *** Agile Hacks – How did you tweak std. agile practices to work in your context (20 mins experience reports only)
    *** Agile Tools Ecosystem
    **** Visibility Tools – Project Management, Information Radiators
    **** Feedback Tools – Code Quality, CI, Deployment, A/B Testing
    *** 90 mins Hands-On Workshops
  • Post-Conference Workshop – 20th and 21st March (10:00 AM – 6:00 PM)

We need your help to pull this off.

Roles, Responsibilities and Compensation for Program Committee Members: http://bit.ly/ai2016-program-team

–> Over the next 10 months, you would be expected to dedicate 30 mins every day (including weekends) to fulfil your role. Only if you are sure you can commit to it, please apply.

DUE DATE: May 15th.

Apply here: http://bit.ly/agileindia16-cfpc

What is Agile’s Biggest Shortcoming?

April 11th, 2015

I’m surprised when people think Agile is perfect and if there are any shortcomings, its not the problem with Agile, instead, it is the person/team/org’s understanding or implementation issue. Some where along the way, the aspect that “We are uncovering better ways of developing software” was lost and agile became this static, rule-based prescriptive and dogmatic cargo-cult thing.

IMHO Agile has made a significant difference (some of it a a placebo effect as well) to the software industry however it has some serious limitations when you try to apply in beyond simple CRUD based applications:

  • Agile works well in linear or organised complexity domains where the problem is fairly well understood (static) and we need to find/evolve the solution iteratively and incrementally. But in domains, where:
    • the problem itself is unknown or constantly shifting,
    • the problem has a dozen or so variables that interact non-linearly. For ex:
      • in life sciences where we’re trying to understanding ageing/growth
      • in anti-terrorism where we have to deal with a crisis situation
      • when simulating chaotic systems like Indian traffic system
      • trying to predict outcomes in systems with distributed intelligence

applying agile values, principles and practices is not the best approach in these cases. We often find ourselves lacking the right kind of thought process and tools to be able to manage such project.

  • Event though the Agile luminaries claim that Agile treats software development as a Complex Adaptive System, they actually try to apply techniques that work in a Complicated Domain.
    • For example, given a problem, we analyse the problem, figure our a best-bet solution (set of practices), apply the solution, see what happens, do a retrospective and tweak the solution (inspect and adapt). This is how you work in a complicated domain. In a complex adaptive domain, we try a few independent safe-fail experiments to solve the problem, but most importantly we do all those experiments in parallel (set-based development approach), so we can really amplify good patterns and dampen bad patterns. We manage the emergence of beneficial patterns with attractors within boundaries. Its like running 5 parallel A/B tests and then coming up with a solution.
  • Agile folks seems to claim that distributed development is hard and you should always prefer collocation. But what about thousands of successful open source projects built by people who’ve never met each other? We seem to be missing something here. Open source project model seems to be way better at motivating people by giving them autonomy, master and sense of purpose. Most agile projects are not able to match this.
  • Today velocity and bunch of other vanity metric is killing agility. There seems to be so much focus on output and very little focus on outcome and learning. Agile has very little to offer in the space of customer development, business model validation, User experience and other important aspects required for a successful product launch. Which is what Lean-Startup movement is trying to address. This is clearly a limitation of Agile methods.

What’s your take?

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